Building Stone Magazine Fall 2011 : Page 48

Sandstone contributes to patient-friendly environment The rich coloring and movement of Pennsylvania sandstone adds to the warm welcoming atmosphere for patients and their families at the Emily Couric Clinical Cancer Center in Charlottesville, VA BY JENNIFER ADAMS W hen designing the Emily Couric Clinical Cancer Center for the University of Virginia Health Sys-bines clinics, infusion, imaging, pharmacy and radiation oncology treatment areas with a full complement of patient and fam-ily support spaces, Select Oak Run sand-stone was employed for exterior and interi-or applications. The material was quarried by Russell Stone Products of Grampian, PA, and supplied through Charles Luck Stone Center of Manakin, VA. “The goal was to make a building that reaches out to patients and families — to give warm and inviting care,” said Clarke. “Older medical buildings from mid-century often have a more ‘cool’ environment. They wanted to come up with a blend of tech-nology which incorporates quality of care and environment. Stone fit in quite well.” The sandstone is complemented by brick — a traditional building material of Virginia — and white metal for detailing and col-umns. “The white metal panel relates to the architecture of the medical center it-self,” said Clarke. “Stone was thought of as a special feature. We used stone to enrich, complement and contrast with brick and white metal.” Clarke explained that there is a circular area that is a designated drop-off for the hospital and cancer center. “Instead of a busy road, they wanted to develop a sense of place — a nicer visual environment with landscape and plantings,” he said. “There tem, the design team at ZGF Architects, LLP of Washington, DC, was sensitive to the needs of patients and their families. “In really simple terms, the client was in-terested in two key things,” explained Richard Clarke of ZGF, Design Principal for the project. “They wanted it to be a warm inviting space, and on a local scale, they wanted it to sit with the overall context of the University of Virginia, the town and the medical center.” To achieve the desired aesthetic for the 150,000-square-foot facility, which com-48 | FALL 2011 — Building Stone Magazine

Sandstone Contributes To Patient-Friendly Environment

Jennifer Adams

The rich coloring and movement of Pennsylvania sandstone adds to the warm welcoming atmosphere for patients and their families at the Emily Couric Clinical Cancer Center in Charlottesville, VA<br /> <br /> When designing the Emily Couric Clinical Cancer Center for the University of Virginia Health System, the design team at ZGF Architects, LLP of Washington, DC, was sensitive to the needs of patients and their families. “In really simple terms, the client was interested in two key things,” explained Richard Clarke of ZGF, Design Principal for the project. “They wanted it to be a warm inviting space, and on a local scale, they wanted it to sit with the overall context of the University of Virginia, the town and the medical center.”<br /> <br /> To achieve the desired aesthetic for the 150,000-square-foot facility, which combines clinics, infusion, imaging, pharmacy and radiation oncology treatment areas with a full complement of patient and family support spaces, Select Oak Run sandstone was employed for exterior and interior applications. The material was quarried by Russell Stone Products of Grampian, PA, and supplied through Charles Luck Stone Center of Manakin, VA.<br /> <br /> “The goal was to make a building that reaches out to patients and families — to give warm and inviting care,” said Clarke. “Older medical buildings from mid-century often have a more ‘cool’ environment. They wanted to come up with a blend of technology which incorporates quality of care and environment. Stone fit in quite well.”<br /> <br /> The sandstone is complemented by brick — a traditional building material of Virginia — and white metal for detailing and columns. “The white metal panel relates to the architecture of the medical center itself,” said Clarke. “Stone was thought of as a special feature. We used stone to enrich, complement and contrast with brick and white metal.”<br /> <br /> Clarke explained that there is a circular area that is a designated drop-off for the hospital and cancer center. “Instead of a busy road, they wanted to develop a sense of place — a nicer visual environment with landscape and plantings,” he said. “There are four vertical piers on each corner — embedded in the buildings they are part of — made of stone.”<br /> <br /> CHOOSING PENNSYLVANIA SANDSTONE<br /> <br /> According to the architect, Select Oak Run sandstone possessed the color and quality that was being sought. “It’s a very beautiful stone,” he said. “It is a warm color — ranging from buff to ochre. It has a high iron content and quite active veining. It was cross cut so you can see the fluidity of the veining, which adds to the rich environment.<br /> <br /> “The stone was a really good choice,” Clarke went on to say. “We wanted the stone to be richer than a typical limestone.”<br /> <br /> Clarke explained that the client was very involved with the selection process. “They wanted the stone to be rich and active,” he said. “They wanted a quality material.”<br /> <br /> According to the architect, the client believed that utilizing high-quality material — such as the sandstone — for the new cancer center could also help fundraising efforts.<br /> <br /> DETERMINING A COLOR RANGE<br /> <br /> “We took a trip to the Pennsylvania quarry and looked at quite a few options,” explained Clarke. “We developed a color and pattern range. The most challenging aspect of the stonework had to do with how active the veining was. We wanted it, but it had to be carefully managed. The supplier had to establish the blend at the quarry.<br /> <br /> “A lot of stone was sent back [from the jobsite] because it fell outside the range,” continued the architect. “But in the end, it came out beautiful.”<br /> <br /> The sandstone cladding was used for pilasters, base coursing, a water table, a large accent wall which transitions from interior to exterior view, radial pilaster bases, perimeter and entry paving, planters and Wall cladding. Additionally, it was employed for paving of the “penthouse patio” as well as interior cladding and flooring for a meditation space designated for patients and their family members.<br /> <br /> On average, the pieces measured between 3 to 4 feet. The thickness of the sandstone used for cladding is 3 inches, and the pieces were secured with mechanical anchoring. The paving and floor tiles have a 1 ½-inch thickness, and They were set in mortar on a concrete slab.<br /> <br /> “Several finishes were applied to different areas,” said John Grubb, Central Region Estimating, of Charles Luck Stone Center. “The most prominent is a Level 3 honed finish, which removed all sawing marks and does not introduce a shiny surface. A split-face finish was given to some accent pieces and a sandblast finish was also used for areas which would have pedestrian and visitor traffic.”<br /> <br /> According to Grubb, the positive experience of using sandstone on the project has led to future applications in Charlottesville. “The successful use of this stone product on the building has allowed for additional use on several other buildings within the zone known as Lee Street, which encompasses the cancer center, a circulation tower building that connects To the parking garage, and also connects by a covered bridge from the circulation tower to the UVA Hospital,” he said. “The hospital is also under construction. They are adding patient rooms to the existing building, and this will also introduce two large stone-clad walls at the ends of the hospital building.”<br /> <br /> Work on the Emily Couric Clinical Cancer Center began in 2005, and it was completed in 2010. “Projects like this take about five years,” explained Clarke. “They moved people in stages so that they could get used to the building.<br /> <br /> “The client had such care in this,” he went on to say. “They appointed a specific person themselves to review the stone as shipments came in. [In the end], they were very happy. I received a letter from Dr. Payton Taylor, the Associate Medical Director of the cancer center. He said the new center makes his patients comfortable, and they say it feels more like a fine hotel than a hospital.”

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